Balanzza digital airline luggage scale reviewed

balanzza luggage scale.jpg

Prior to using the Balanzza digital luggage scale I had an awkward way of weighing my luggage before leaving on a trip. In order to meet airline weight limits (typically 50 pounds) I’d try to position my fat suitcase on the bathroom scale. This was an imperfect method because it was nearly impossible to read the weight without shifting the suitcase around on the scale which in turn produced inaccurate readings. When I found the Balanzza luggage scale I had to give it a try to see whether it was a better method than the old bathroom scale.

The Balanzza scale is simple to use. I consists of two pieces. The device (scale) itself and a luggage strap that you buckle around the handle of your suitcase.

balanzza luggage tool.jpg

The scale can be set to measure in pounds or kilos. The weight limit is 100 lb or 44 Kg. Once you pick your luggage up, the device beeps to indicate that the weight has been read. The scale locks in and displays the highest weight measurement. This is a significantly easier method for weighing your luggage than putting it on a tiny bathroom scale and trying to view the weight from underneath your luggage.

balanzza scale readout.jpg

Recently Balanzza introduced a new model called the Ergo at the same suggested price of $24.95.

balanzza ergo.jpg

This model is supposed to be more ergonomic and allow for an easier time lifting your luggage. In my testing the old style Balanzza was easy to lift as evidenced by the pictures of my kids weighing the luggage.

kids balanzza.jpg

Link: Balanzza

Cost: $ 24.95

What’s Good:
– Easy to use
– Much better than using your bathroom scale
– Can pack this in your luggage to weigh luggage before returning
– Inexpensive
– Strap makes attaching device simple

What Could Be Improved:
– Backlight the screen

Categories: Reviews


6 replies

  1. i just get on my bathroom scale myself, then get on while holding my luggage and subtract :)

  2. Cool idea!

    I’m always afraid to look at my “no luggage” weight…

  3. Excellent review. May I suggest some additional tests?
    1. Compare the result of this scale with a couple of others. Ideally, we should compare it with an airport’s scale (that is, if you going on a trip, compare, then follow up).
    2. Have you ever tried to weight something that is more than 100 pounds? Does the scale fall apart and die, does it falsely tell you that the luggage is 100 pounds, or correctly tell you that the luggage is more than 100 pounds?

  4. Good point — I’m going on a trip next Thursday and I’ll test the accuracy compared to the airlines.

    I should have mentioned that I tested it against my bathroom scale and it weighed the same.

    I can test the 100lb question tonigh.

  5. This looks like a great idea because you can pack it and take it on the trip with you. Our luggage always weighs more on the way home. On one trip this summer we had the fun experience of having to open our luggage in the check-in line and transfer some stuff from one bag to the others to get it within weight. (which really ticked me off, I mean if the total for all our bags was within guidelines how did it help them for us to shift it around.)

    BTW, check out Brian Regan’s bit about weighing large packages on a bathroom scale:

  6. Tip: Take the heaviest stuff in carry on which is not weighed and only need fit above you in the bins (some size restrictions). Learned this during SCUBA trip to Bahamas where the instructors advised keeping regulators and dive computers with us to avoid both theft and the weight issue.

    Just don’t forget (like I did) that liquids aren’t allowed in carryon or they’ll give you a lecture as if you’re just emerging from first grade and then send you on your way without your liquids.