KindleGate: Confusion Abounds Regarding Kindle Download Policy

GearDiary KindleGate: Confusion Abounds Regarding Kindle Download Policy

I’ve been on top of KindleGate most of the afternoon. It took speaking with three MORE customer reps today, plus the one yesterday, to finally get accurate, or what I hope is accurate, information.

This sordid tale began last night when I was setting up my iPhone 3G S, and a book I went to download to the Amazon Kindle app would not download.  I called customer service to inquire about the issue. In short order the customer representative told me that each publisher determines the number of times a book can be downloaded, and once that download number is reached the book needs to be repurchased. When I asked where this was written, he said in the fine print of the legal document you signed when you start your Kindle account. When asked how one would know how many times you can download the book he said, “you can’t we don’t even know.”  I purchased a new copy of the book in question, and as soon as I got home last night, wrote the post that went up about midnight.

This afternoon I received an e-mail from Amazon confirming a refund for the book that I re-purchased yesterday. Funny thing was… I hadn’t requested a refund. In fact, I hadn’t had any interaction with Amazon since the call with a customer representative yesterday. I was perplexed…

I called Amazon to inquire about the refund I received.  That’s when the fun really began. That’s when it became crystal clear that the issues surrounding DRM and Kindles is confusing to us as end-users because… it’s just as confusing to the customer representatives at Amazon. No, that’s being far too generous. The whole issue is confusing to us as end-users because the Amazon representatives who are supposed to clarify issues… don’t have a clue! It got so bad in fact, that one of the representatives along the way actually use the line, “Oh I’m sure you were told that yesterday because we were having downloading issues that they’ve been fixed.” Ah yes, and I can’t read this book because the dog ate my Kindle.

Here’s what happened —

I called up the first representative to ask about the refund, and I asked for an explanation and a clarification on the digital rights management policy with regard to Kindle books. The rep said, “Let me transfer you,” and before I could say another word,  put me on hold. A bit later a new customer representative got on the phone.  Here is a fairly accurate transcript of one part of that (long) conversation —

Him — You can download an unlimited number of times.

Me — If that’s the case why was I told that sometimes it’s five or six times and sometimes it’s one time?

Him — You can download an unlimited number of times to any specific device.

Me — So it’s not the number of downloads the way the rep yesterday said but the number of devices?

Him– Right.

Me– What if I get a new device?

Him — Most books give you six or seven devices that you can have it on at any one time.

Me — What about the 8th device? What if I get a new Kindle and new iPhone and they are eight and nine but are the only devices at the time that I am using.

Him — I believe we can release more licenses.

Me– You believe or you know? And does that mean that on my seventh Kindle I need to call Amazon and ask you to release each book one at a time?

Him — Well that’s up to the publisher

Me — Huh? I thought you said it could be downloaded an unlimited number of times to any device, could be on five or six devices at any one time and you could release more devices if need be.  Is that the case or is it up to the publisher to determine? I’m getting more confused not less.

He said, “No, you can download a book an unlimited number of times.”

Me- Then why was I told there was a limit and for some books it is five or six but for others it might be just one.

Him- No you can download it and remove it and redownload it.

Me- That’s all well and good but yesterday I was told that there was a limit to the number of times it can be downloaded.

Him- Oh, well there is a limit to the number of devices you can download to but the majority of books let you download to five or six.

Me- So how do you know if it is one or six in advance? And what happens when I am on device number seven and the cap is six.

Him– To be honest with you that’s going to be a problem.

(Seriously, that’s what he said!)

Me- That IS a problem and it is also not an acceptable answer when real money is involved in the purchase. I would really like a better answer than that.

Him- Let me check.

I was put on hold for an extended period of time. After which he came back and said,  “I checked and you can download any book to any device an unlimited number of times and you can have any given book on six devices at a time.”

I then said, “So you’re telling me that every book that I purchased through Amazon for the Kindle can be on up to six devices at any given time and you can release all of those licenses if I change devices?”

He replied, “Yes that’s what I’m saying.”

Me– “Six times?”

Him– “Right!”

At which point I read him the following e-mail. It had arrived about 30 seconds before, likely as a result of his conversation while I was on hold…

Dan,

I’ve reviewed our previous correspondence regarding your problem downloading Kindle books to your iPhone, and I’m sorry for the inconvenience and miscommunication on this matter. We have identified the issue and are working on a solution to address it. In the short term, we have corrected the problem on your account. You should now be able to download and read your Kindle books on your iPhone and iTouch devices.

We have also refunded you for the duplicate purchase of the book.

Publishers choose whether they apply DRM to their content and thus determine how many copies of each title can be downloaded to different Kindle devices at the same time. There is no limit on the number of times a title can be downloaded, only limits on the number of simultaneous devices.

I apologize again for the inconvenience.

Sincerely,

I continued, “So you told me that any book can be on six different devices, while your colleague sent me an e-mail that says that each publisher determines how many devices you can have. I’m even more confused now than I was before, and before I spend another penny on books for my Amazon Kindle I really would like to know what the actual policy is because you put me on hold and came back with a different answer than e-mail that I got.”

He put me on hold once again.

About 10 minutes later, a third customer representative (this was the fourth person I had spoken to at this point!) got on the phone and attempted to “clarify” even further. He did give me some specifics which I will get into in a few minutes. Before I get to them however, he did something that would have been impressive if it were quite so big of a concern — he apologized.  Sort of.

I asked why it was that I got totally wrong information from the customer service representative yesterday and from the first two customer service representatives I talked to today. I asked him, “How is a customer supposed to know any of this? Especially when the first three customer service reps I spoke to got it completely wrong?  They are the ones that customers like me turn to to get the information, and they told me something totally different than what you’re telling me now.”

He responded, “Yeah that’s a training glitch that we had, and I’m really sorry about that. Like I said I’m going to  address this problem here.”

I pushed a little bit harder, perhaps a little too hard, and said, “I spoke with three customer service representatives before you, and every one of them gave me the wrong information. That’s not a training glitch, that’s people at Amazon not having any clue about the DRM policy and that’s a problem.”

He responded, “We face new situations every day and quite frankly we’ve never run into this problem before, but now that you’ve raised the issue please know that it will be addressed directly.”

Personally I find it amazing that my questions were “new situations”. It seems rather basic that when dealing with a DRM system the vendor and the customer should easily know-

1. How many downloads are possible

2. How many devices material can be on

3. What the options are when the number of downloads or machines is exceeded.

He then told me that he would be retraining all the customer reps so they have the correct information and future customers won’t run into similar situations.

I’m glad I could help 🙂

So Here Is The Bottom Line — (I think…)

According to the last customer representative spoke to…

You are able to redownload your books an unlimited number of times to any specific device.

Any one time the books can be on a finite number of devices. In most cases that means you can have  the same book on six different devices.

Unfortunately the publishers decide how many licenses, that is devices, a book can be on at any one time. While most of the time that will be five or six different devices there will be times when it’s only one device.

At the present time there is no way to know how many devices can be licensed prior to buying the book.

According to the customer rep, there is a project to try to get that information available to the customer but it’s not yet available.

Finally, when you have reached a limit of six devices and you swap one older device for a new one, it does not automatically reset the number of licenses so you can add the new one. Amazon can release all of the licenses which will remove any given book from all of the devices and then allow you to re-download it that same number of times.

In other words, if his information was accurate, and the runaround I got this afternoon does make me continue to wonder, once you purchase a book you will have access to it going forward….

You just may have some hoops to go through along the way.


About the Author

Dan Cohen
Having a father who was heavily involved in early laser and fiber-optical research, Dan grew up surrounded by technology and gadgets. Dan’s father brought home one of the very first video games when he was young and Dan remembers seeing a “pre-release” touchtone phone. (When he asked his father what the “#” and “*” buttons were his dad said, “Some day, far in the future, we’ll have some use for them.”) Technology seemed to be in Dan’s blood but at some point he took a different path and ended up in the clergy. His passion for technology and gadgets never left him. Dan is married to Raina Goldberg who is also an avid user of Apple products. They live in New Jersey with their golden doodle Nava.