The LifeWorks Voyager Backpack Review: Organized and Stylish Storage

With so many backpacks on the market, they can all become a blur of black … but every now and then one comes along that is so well thought out that it stands out — and the Lifeworks Voyager Pack is one such example.

GearDiary The LifeWorks Voyager Backpack Review: Organized and Stylish Storage

Rather than going with a plain black, the Voyager is dressed up with thousands of tiny silver dots and flashes of red. You might think that this would give it a gaudy or flashy appearance, but that is not the case; instead, it gives the overall appearance of the Voyager a bit of visual appeal — something “more”.

The backpack is composed of nylon material that is stain and dirt resistant, and it feels like it will be able to resist the material pulling or tearing easily. It measures approximately 18.75″ tall x 14″ wide by 7.25″ deep, and it weighs about two pounds.

The back of the Voyager is covered in black mesh, which should help keep air flowing between the wearer’s back and the pack; this is great on summer days, and it will help avoid the dreaded back sweat common in less breathable fabrics.

The approximately 3″ wide straps are well-padded, and they are very comfortable on my shoulders. There are loops at the bottom of the straps to allow for attaching things like water bottles or other items from a carabiner clip. Black webbed straps with silver metal buckles at the bottoms of the shoulder straps allow for a perfect load adjustment.

GearDiary The LifeWorks Voyager Backpack Review: Organized and Stylish Storage

On each side of the Voyager, there are open pockets that can hold your phone, a water bottle, or any other item you wish to stow. All of the zippers have metal pull-tabs that have been covered in red looped plastic, so they are very easy to grab and pull.

The front of the backpack has a zippered pocket that is also held secure with a nylon strap with metal connector — in case you don’t feel like zipping it shut, I suppose closing this will keep most of your items inside. This front pocket measures approximately 12.5″ deep x 8″ wide, and it is a great place to stow your power brick, cables, and other miscellaneous larger items.

Looks at the nice 1.5″ wide padded handle on top of the bag; if you wide up carrying your backpack by the strap at times (and don’t we all?), you’ll really appreciate how comfortable it is in hand.

GearDiary The LifeWorks Voyager Backpack Review: Organized and Stylish Storage

Just behind the front pocket panel is the first major dual zippered compartment which measures approximately 17″ long x 11″ wide. On the part that flaps open, there is a 9″ wide x 6″ deep pocket that is the perfect place to stow your passport or airline tickets when traveling. Because its back wall is padded, this is also a good place to stow a second laptop, if you are unfortunate enough to have to carry one.

GearDiary The LifeWorks Voyager Backpack Review: Organized and Stylish Storage

The next large compartment, also secured by dual zippers, is the business section. The zippers open to more than halfway down the backpack allowing total access to the contents. Inside this section, there are two large pockets — the nylon pocket on the outer wall is perfect for holding your tablet — up to iPad Pro size. The cushioned pocket on the inside wall will hold up to a 16″ screen laptop, and it is lined in a plush scratch-resistant fabric. I have a 13″ MacBook Pro, and this pocket is deep enough that both sides are completely protected.

The bottom of this section is the perfect catchall for any other gear that you need to carry.

And between the two main zippered sections is the feature that I’ve come to look for in my favorite laptop bags — a dedicated zippered pouch that can hold my sunglasses. Of course, you can also stow your phone or other delicate electronics there, but with its soft pile lining, it is just begging to cradle sunnies.

GearDiary The LifeWorks Voyager Backpack Review: Organized and Stylish Storage

Everything about this laptop bag is very well thought out, but if you are someone who expects to see a dedicated card holder or pen loops or if you don’t want a large-ish brand name on the front, you will be disappointed. Here’s the one feature that I think makes up for that loss, though …

Can you believe it? This backpack does not attract cat or dog hair — as in NONE whatsoever! If, like me, you have animals in your home, then you know what a struggle it can be to keep white fur (or any fur) off of your cloth items. There’s no need to occasionally hit this thing with a lint brush — even if your cat claims it as his bed when you aren’t traveling, you’ll be able to pick it up and go without embarrassing fur clinging to every surface.

A light and comfortable backpack that doesn’t attract pet hair, has room enough for up to two laptops, a separate compartment for your tablet, zippered compartments for your valuables, tons of space for your chargers, battery packs, and other gear plus a dedicated sunglasses holder … what’s not to like?

The Lifeworks Voyager Backpack comes in a black and red combo or a blue and green combo; it retails for $79.99, and it is available directly from the manufacturer, or you can find it for as low as $58.97 on Amazon [affiliate link].

Source: Manufacturer supplied review sample

What I Like: Room for two laptops up to 16″; Dedicated sunglasses holder; A separate pocket for tablets; Lots of room to stow your extra peripherals and gear; Wide padded handle on the top; Light backpack with comfortable, wide shoulder straps; Doesn’t attract pet hair (yay!)

What Needs Improvement: Some may miss a dedicated pocket for business cards and pen loops; The Lifeworks logo on the front is a bit large


About the Author

Judie Lipsett Stanford
I've had a fascination with all types of gadgets and gizmos since I was a child, beginning with the toy robot that my grandmother gave my brother - which I promptly "relieved him of" in 1973. I'm a self-professed gadget magpie. I can't tell you how everything works, but I'm known world-wide for using a product until I have a full understanding of what it does, what its limitations are, and if it excels in any given area — or not.