The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

Earlier this year I reviewed the Dyson Pure Cool Link Tower, a connected fan that purifies the air it’s blowing while keeping the room cool. In late summer, Dyson released their new Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan, and this winter has been a great time for me to put it to the test.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

I live in West Texas, and we know winter is actually here when the juniper trees start to release their pollen; the wind kicks up, and I (along with countless others) start suffering from severe allergies brought on by the juniper pollen. We have a name for it in Texas: Cedar Fever. If you are affected by it, as so many of us are, you know how miserable it can make you. It’s the reason why our windows remain closed on the nicer days in between cold spells, and it is one of the reasons I am grateful that the Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link has an excellent air purifier.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link ships already assembled; setting it up is a simple matter of removing it from the box and figuring out where you would like to place it.

The Pure Hot+Cool Link measures approximately 25″ tall by 8.75″ deep and wide, and it weighs almost 8.5 pounds. The top of the shiny white and matte gray plastic fan has the long oval look that we’ve grown accustomed to seeing from Dyson’s tower fans; this is the design that allows their Air Multiplier technology to produce a long-range projection that circulates purified air across the room. The Pure Hot+Cool Link is also available in a shiny blue and matte gray model.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

The bottom of the Hot+Cool has a similar perforated design to what we saw with the Dyson Pure Cool Link Tower I reviewed in May; this is where air, odors, and any loose particles floating around in the air are sucked in to be processed through the 360° Glass HEPA filter.

There are buttons on either side that can be pressed to remove the outer casing when it’s time to replace the filter or should you ever need to brush off something that’s causing a blockage.

I’m jumping ahead of myself just a bit but on the back of the fan, there is a plastic hatch which should only be opened when the filter is being replaced …

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

… inside the hatch, there is a black input that will need to be wiped down at the time you change the filter to help maintain sensor accuracy.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

Once you’ve removed the Hot+Cool from the box and figured out where you’d like to place it, you’ll want to connect it to the Dyson Link app. This is a simple process of connecting it as a new device, selecting it from the list of Dyson connected products that will pop up, and then entering your home WiFi network information. Each Dyson Link product has its own WiFi password and MAC address.

With the Dyson Link app, you’ll be able to check on the quality of the air in the room where your Dyson Pure Hot+Cool is placed; it will also tell you the temperature, humidity, and AQI — which is an outdoor air quality reading that tells you how much air pollution is present in the air you’re breathing — of the town you live in versus inside your room. From the app, you can also set up a specific schedule of times for the Pure Hot+Cool to run; from my experience with the  Dyson Pure Link Cool Tower, I usually just leave it on automatic. There’s also a product guide that you can refer to, should you have any questions about how to operate the Pure Hot+Cool down the road. The last option is Settings, and that is where you can update your purifier’s name, time zone, and software. You can set one of three air quality targets: “I want to maintain good air quality”, “I’m sensitive to particles and pollutants”, or “I’m very sensitive to particles and pollutants”. When your purifier is in auto mode, it will target that level of air quality for you. The app can also give you historical data for how the air quality in your room has been, and it can tell you how many hours your purifier has been running that day and how many hours you have remaining on your filter’s life.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

Filter life remaining on the Dyson Pure Cool Link Tower I reviewed in May

This is a good time for me to mention filter life. Since any time the fan or heater is running, the purifier is also running, at $69.99 to replace you might wonder how long these filters actually last. Well, I reviewed the Pure Cool Link Tower in May, and that fan with purifier runs at least 7 – 10 hours per day; I still have 3288 hours remaining. In other words, the filters are long-life and shouldn’t need replacing more than every year to year and a half.

Moving on to the basic operation of the Pure Hot+Cool …

Like the other Dyson fans I’ve reviewed, this one comes with a remote control that handles all of the fan’s functions; the remote control is pretty self-explanatory, but there are a couple of functions I’ll go over.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

The focused mode is great for when you are trying to concentrate the airflow to one specific area. Diffused mode is more for spreading the airflow all through the room, not just in one concentrated area. You can set the Pure Hot+Cool to oscillate, and it has a sleep timer if you want it to turn off on its own after a set time. The moon icon is for night mode, which dims the LED on the front of the fan and quiets the sound of the blower a bit.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

Let’s look at some of the different things you might see while operating your Pure Hot+Cool.

The blue ring around the power button means that the Pure Hot+Cool is in cooling mode. The “1” means the fan is on the lowest setting (it will go all the way up to 10, which is pretty gusty).

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

The red ring means that the heater is on; it’s displaying the target temperature that I’d like the room to reach. You can crank the heat all the way up to 99º, which is great when you are trying to heat a cold room you’ve just entered, but blazing, insanely hot if you are sitting in front of the heater in focused mode.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

The green A means that the Pure Hot+Cool is in Automatic mode; I’ve set it to 66º, so it will turn the heat on and off to maintain whatever temperature I’ve selected.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

The Pure Hot+Cool Link can be tilted up to aim cool or hot air into the room, it can be focused down toward your feet, or it can shoot straight out at you. Where and how you are using the Hot+Cool will determine how you’d prefer it be aimed.

Although the Dyson is weighted on the bottom, there is always a chance that it might get knocked over by a boisterous pet or clumsy housemate while it’s running; if that happens, the Hot+Cool will immediately turn off — whether it’s in heating or cooling mode.

Like the other Dyson fans I’ve reviewed, the remote control stores conveniently on top of the tower with a magnet holding it in place.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

According to Pollen.com, my town is in the midst of rampant juniper pollination, not that I even needed to check that site to know; all I have to do is step outside, and I know it, I feel it.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

Running the Pure Hot+Cool Link in our living room makes a difference; it is part of a system that I use to keep the air quality in my home at a level where I don’t get the sore throat, itchy eyes, and runny nose common with juniper season. Even better, it envelops me in a warm pocket of perfectly heated air without having to run the central heat to warm the entire house. This is what the air quality looks like in my living room, thanks to Dyson … I can breathe, and I am comfortable.

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan Review: Pure Air with Smart Temperature Control

 

The Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link Air Purifier Heater & Fan retails for $599, and it is available directly from Dyson or from other retailers including Amazon, where it is as low as $491.09 [affiliate link].

Source: Manufacturer supplied review sample

What I Like: Compact tower fan that purifies the air while either heating or cooling the room; Instant feedback and control through the connected Android or iOS app; 360º base allows air to draw in from everywhere — not just the rear of the purifier; Possible to schedule the fan to run automatically during certain hours of the day; There is a definite improvement of air quality when the Pure Hot+Cool is running; The fan is quiet as it runs in the background; When in night mode, the fan’s display dims and it runs quietly; When you have continuous monitoring on, the purifier runs continuously at a low-speed monitoring temperature, humidity, and air quality; The filter lasts approximately a year (possibly longer), and the app will tell you when it has reached the end of its life; The fan can be set to oscillate, so it cools or heats the entire room while it purifies the air

What Needs Improvement: It is expensive

About the Author

Judie Lipsett Stanford
I've had a fascination with all types of gadgets and gizmos since I was a child, beginning with the toy robot that my grandmother gave my brother - which I promptly "relieved him of" in 1973. I'm a self-confessed gadget magpie. I can't tell you how everything works, but I'm known world-wide for using a product until I have a full understanding of what it does, what its limitations are, and if it excels in any given area ... or not.