Lexus Rolls out Newest SUV Tech and Highlights Hotel Partner Program

Now about those user interfaces. Perhaps I was more of a fan of the puck-like stubby joystick controller that was a feature in the larger models like the LX570, GX460, RX450h and RX350 because that’s what I was already used to, but I vastly preferred it over the touchpad option that is part of the center console of the crossover NX200t and NX300h models that we drove. I drive an old Camry hybrid, (which I surprised they even allowed me to park in the same lot with all these beautiful LUVs) so I have learned my way around the Toyota touchscreen system for a decade, but I find the combination of the joystick with trigger buttons on both sides to be quite easy to use, especially after a little practice. This makes keeping your eye on the road and off the screens much easier.

Courtesy of Lexus.com

However, the trackpad in the smaller models pretty much baffled me. Even when I was testing it from the passenger seat as another journo took the wheel, I could never seem to get the cursor to go where I wanted, and after a while I just stopped trying. When I spoke to a Lexus rep about this he said that perhaps the haptic feedback was set a little too low. When I drove the vehicle again, I paid more attention to the bumps and buzzes that the pad was feeding back to me, and I got a little bit more comfortable with the setup. However, on the whole, it was frustrating enough to be a deal-killer for me with regard to the UI in those two particular models. Your mileage may vary.

Courtesy of Lexus.com

But those other cars, lawdy I could get used to driving any of them. Despite the fact that it felt as big as a bread truck to drive on windy mountain roads, the LX570 took them like a champ, surprisingly nimble and helpfully chirping and vibrating the steering wheel whenever my driving companion might sneak a little bit across the lane divide since he was so uncomfortable driving such a big beast. He was from New York City, a place that terrifies me to even drive in, so I cut him some slack. I grew up driving a ‘69 Mercury Marquis, so big cars don’t scare me.

Courtesy of Lexus.com

opinion, just right. Thanks to 301 hp provided by a 4.6 liter V8, it had plenty of zip off the line and still maintained the torque to perform at higher speeds. Even on the curvy mountain track, it held its line well and hugged the road through tight turns. It was a true delight to be behind the wheel of the GX460. I don’t need a vehicle that has three rows of seats and can transport seven passengers because I don’t have that many friends. Just kidding. I do have that many friends, but I don’t want to ferry their butts around everywhere.

Courtesy of Lexus.com

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About the Author

Chris Chamberlain
Chris is a native of Nashville, TN and an honors graduate from Stanford University (where it should have occurred to him in the late `80's that maybe this computer business thing was gonna take off.) After 25 years in the business of selling flattened dead trees to printers who used them to make something which the ancients called "books," somebody finally slapped Chris over the head with an iPad whereupon he became the Director of Business Development for an internet services company that works with US retailers to help them sell their products overseas. His other day gig is as a food and drink writer for several regional newspapers, magazines and blogs. Chris has a travel/restaurant guide/cookbook coming out next fall which he is sure your mother would just love as a holiday present.