With Weight and Exercise Like Everything Else, If It Sounds Too Good To Be True …

Pretty much everyone would like to alter their body in some way: lose weight, gain weight, more muscular build, change ratios or sizes of things, and so on. And another thing you can be certain about: for every desired change there is someone waiting to try to sell you something to deal with it.

There are plenty of legitimate supplements if you have a deficiency or absorption issues or whatever, but those are all things you should be getting from your doctor. Chances are that your general practitioner is NOT going to be giving you something to ‘lose 20 pounds a week without diet or exercise’, ‘build muscles without a trip to the gym’, or ‘gain size … ‘.

The fact is that most of the products that DO promise un-natural sounding results range somewhere from useless scams to dangerous.

Having just finished the Olympics, it is clear that great results require hard work, and anything else should be approached cautiously – and with your doctor’s advice. Because while the comic shows a rather obviously farcical look at an extreme (and consequence-laden) weight loss method … many things you will see in commercials, magazines or internet ads are not really much different. The old adage “If It Sounds Too Good To Be True … It Probably IS!” Applies as much as ever.

Source: Penny Arcade

Categories: Gear Bits, Health and Fitness, News


1 reply

  1. I have found that people are extremely resistant to change their habits, when it comes to weight loss, even if the change is small and simple.

    Two quick examples: a year ago, I cut out all sugar drinks and went to a stand up desk at work. Separately, each habit is worth about 5 lbs a year. I even convinced 2 coworkers to do the same (both coworkers were already on a health kick, so it didn’t take much convincing).

    The rest of my coworkers? They see us standing, they see us shed the weight, and they think of us as aliens, doing some routine that is too difficult to replicate.